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The Page Experience Report

The Page Experience Report

Google’s page experience report gives you a clear and comprehensive summary of a webpage’s user experience.

It evaluates the metrics of the page for individual URLs on a website and brands and retailers are capable of using them to analyze their current scores and use them as a reference point for future enhancements.

At the moment, the page experience metrics are only evaluated for the mobile experience (it considers the user experience on mobile devices, with only searches from mobile being affected).

The evaluation of the page experience uses the following criteria:

Core Web Vitals

The Page Experience ReportGoogle’s Core Web Vitals test the speed, responsiveness, and page stability of a webpage. Within the report, each URL is provided a rating of “Good”, “Needs Improvement”, or “Poor”.

Of course, in order to qualify as a good page experience, a page needs to have a “Good” Core Web Vitals rating. Yet it’s worth noting that it takes a few days to import data from the Core Web Vitals report into the page experience report.

This means that the rating for a page in the page experience report will often lag behind the page’s rating for Core Web Vitals.

Mobile usability 

In order to qualify for a “Good” status in the page experience report, a URL needs to have no errors when it comes to mobile usability.

HTTPS

In order to achieve a “Good” page experience status, a page needs to be served over HTTPS. Another important point to make here is that the page experience report does not have URL-level HTTPS data on your website, just the overall HTTP/HTTPS ratio for the website.

If a website has a high HTTP URL ratio then you will see a warning banner, while the HTTPS section will display a sign saying “Failing.”

Remember: in order for a URL to be counted in the page experience, it has to have data held in the Core Web Vitals report. There is one exception, however, where a URL without data in the Core Web Vitals report can appear in a page experience report, and that is when a URL group for a specific URL already appears in Core Web Vitals.

The missing data

In instances where you do not see your website has enough data, it means that your site is new to the Google Search Console, or that there is not enough meaningful data available in the CrUX report. 

The Page Experience ReportThe database in the CrUX report collects information on URLs yet it can lag a few days for the data to become visible and usable. If you see a sign saying “Not enough data collected” instead of expecting to see a chart, then this means that there is still not enough data for the URL coming from the Core Web Vitals report.

Additionally, if you see a message that reads “Not enough recent usage data for Core Web Vitals” in the report, then there is not enough recent data from the CrUX report to generate enough Core Web Vitals information. However, this part is out of your hands, because the data from the CrUX report is generated by user visits – so you simply have to wait until enough digital users trickle onto the site to accumulate enough data to generate the report.

And if you see the message “Not enough data for HTTPS” then this means that the Search Console is unable to find any info on URLs that are HTTPS. What to do? Just wait for Google to continue crawling your website.

And finally, if you see a message that says “Not enough recent site traffic for a complete evaluation” then this means one of two possibilities: that there is a gap in recent HTTPS, or a gap in Core Web Vitals data.

Here is the set criteria for a URL to get a “Good” rating status from Google Search:

  1. The URL has a “Good” status within the Core Web Vitals report. 
  2. All of the following are true:
  3. The URL has no issues with mobile usability from the Mobile Usability report.
  4. The URL is served over HTTPS.

And here is the criteria for a URL to get a “Failed” rating status from Google Search:

  1. At least one of the following is true:
  2. The URL has either a “Needs improvement” or “Poor” status on the Core Web Vitals report.
  3. The URL is served using HTTP.
  4. The URL has at least one issue with mobile usability in the Mobile Usability report.

PS: ArganoUV is one of the world’s leading Core Web Vitals agencies. Contact us to see how we can work together.

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